Survivorship of Hip and Knee Implants in Pediatric and Young Adult Populations: Analysis of Registry and Published Data

Art Sedrakyan, MD, PhD; Lucas Romero, MPA; Stephen Graves, MBBS, DPhil, FRACS, FAOrthA; David Davidson, MBBS, FRCSEd, FRACS; Richard de Steiger, MBBS; Peter Lewis, MBBS, FRACS(Orth), FAOrthA; Michael Solomon, MBChB, FRACS(Orth); Robyn Vial, MAppSc(Pharm); Michelle Lorimer, BSc(Maths&CompSc)(Hons)

12/17/2014

Abstract

Background: One of the least researched areas in orthopaedic pediatrics is the safety and effectiveness of joint replacement, in part because it is uncommon and is undertaken for a wide range of conditions not common for adult joint replacement. This study used data from the AOANJRR (Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry) to analyze the use of total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in the pediatric population and to provide preliminary data on the outcome of these procedures.

Methods: The AOANJRR, which is part of the ICOR (International Consortium of Orthopaedic Registries), provided information on pediatric procedures reported to the registry by hospitals undertaking arthroplasty procedures in Australia. All THA and TKA procedures reported to the registry from 1999 to 2012 were included. The cumulative percent revision and the hazard ratio from Cox proportional-hazards models were used for analysis. All tests were two-tailed, with a 5% level of significance. Additionally, an overview of the literature is presented to provide a point of reference.

Results: Primary conventional THA was performed in 297 patients twenty years of age or younger; the cumulative percent revision at five years was 4.5%. Primary conventional THA was performed in 975 young adults twenty-one to thirty years of age; the cumulative percent revision at five years was 5.4%. Primary THA was performed in 105 patients twenty years of age or younger; the cumulative percent revision at five years was 4.6%. Primary TKA was performed in 159 young adults twenty-one to thirty years of age; the cumulative percent revision at five years was 10.3%.

Conclusions: Compared with older adults, pediatric patients and young adults undergoing THA and TKA have very different diagnoses, including a high prevalence of tumor. Although the reported rate of revision surgery is currently similar to that for older patients, the number of reported procedures and the follow-up period remain limited. It is important for registries to continue to collect and analyze data relevant to this cohort and to coordinate these activities in order to better understand the safety and effectiveness of joint arthroplasty in the pediatric population.


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